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Don Chase and Sarah

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IN SPACE - SEPTEMBER 12: In this satellite image provided by U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hurricane Florence churns through the Atlantic Ocean toward the U.S. East Coast on September 12, 2018. Florence slowed its approach to the U.S. today and was forecast to turn south, stalling along the North Carolina and South Carolina coast and bringing with it torrential rain, high winds and a dangerous storm surge tomorrow through Saturday. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)

From Space: Hurricane Florence (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)

At church today, I overheard the words, “oh no here we go again.”  Now, honestly I am not sure what the group was talking about. Fast forward to this
afternoon. I caught myself thinking those exact same words. As I was looking at the predicted weather forecast for the coming week, I came across the words “tropical depression.” It appears that there is an area of low pressure forming in the Tennessee valley. From there, it is expected to move South into the Gulf of Mexico. What will happen next is anyone’s guess. Some forecasters have even mentioned our least favorite word, hurricane.  Could this low pressure develop into a hurricane? Some weather prognosticators are giving it a 50/50 chance. If you have been in the Tar Heel state for the past 5 years, the word hurricane is not a friendly term. After hurricane Matthew in 2016, we heard “this was our every 100 year storm.” Two short years later, hurricane Florence knocked on our front door and then knocked it down flooding the region yet again. Just like you, I have had my share of hurricanes for a lifetime. When I was growing up, my Bladenboro, North Carolina family would speak of 1954 and Hurricane Hazel. Hazel made landfall along our Atlantic coast and then cut a path of destruction all the way into Canada. Just prior to joining the BIG 957 in 1989, Hurricane Hugo came ashore near Charleston, South Carolina. Hugo would tear his way into the Charlotte, North Carolina area and then moving on to the Great Lakes region. Prior to Hugo’s arrival, I volunteered to stay on the air all night long at my first full time radio station, 1340 WAGR & Country 102 WJSK in Lumberton, North
Carolina. Let me tell you, that Alamac Road radio station building produced many a scary and creepy sound that long and terrifying night my friend. Unbelievably, the radio station never lost power.  Please join me in saying a prayer that this 2019 Atlantic Hurricane season will turn out to be a mild one. I was asked once how could I so easily remember the start date and end date of hurricane season? My awesome mother-in-law’s birthday was June 1. My incredible father-in-law’s birthday was November 30. One other thing. It’s always a great idea to plan “ahead” of these future storms. In the next day or so, I will have specific and helpful details to help us both prepare.